Booth and Beyond

Posted 6/29/22

FROM THE CORNER During COVID my wife and I put together a considerable number of jigsaw puzzles. To our surprise the responses from our friends varied from a “puzzled look” to a few even trying …

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Booth and Beyond

Posted

FROM THE CORNER

During COVID my wife and I put together a considerable number of jigsaw puzzles. To our surprise the responses from our friends varied from a “puzzled look” to a few even trying it and liking it. I came across the following article and since I am away this week I want to use this space to share it. The article is courtesy of Brandpoint (BPT) and is entitled, “7 surprising benefits of doing jigsaw puzzles.” Some of it has been paraphrased, but much of it is as the article stated. Brandpoint is an agency that helps brands share their message in newspapers. *** There’s a quiet movement in this country and it doesn’t involve apps, data or the latest fad. Jigsaw puzzles are seeing a resurgence in popularity. Perhaps because it’s an opportunity to unplug and give yourself and family an escape from the information overload that is buzzing through every fabric of our lives 24/7. Wrestling yourself from screens, devices, even television can be a nearly impossible task, but it’s vital to our mental and even physical health. A jigsaw puzzle requires your full attention and therein lies the magic. Many people are thus returning to the quiet pastime of childhood. Call it a retro revolution. If you have never challenged yourself to a puzzle start with one that is 500 pieces. They’re designed to balance challenge with ability to solve. The following are the benefits of puzzling. *** Jigsaw puzzles exercise the left and right sides of your brain at once. Your left brain is logical and works in a linear fashion, while you right brain is creative and intuitive. When you’re doing a jigsaw puzzle, both sides are engaged. Think of it as a mental workout that improves your problem-solving skills and attention span. *** Jigsaw puzzles improve your short-term memory. Can’t remember what you had for lunch yesterday? Jigsaw puzzles can help with that. Doing a puzzle reinforces connections between brain cells, improves mental speed and is an especially effective way to improve short-term memory. *** Jigsaw puzzles improve your visual-spatial reasoning. When you do a jigsaw puzzle, you need to look at individual pieces and figure out where they’ll fit into the big picture. If you do it regularly, you’ll improve visual-spatial reasoning, which helps with driving a car, packing, using a map, learning and following dance moves, and a whole host of other things. *** Jigsaw puzzles are a great meditation tool and stress reliever. Focusing on one image for a long period of time, without extraneous thoughts entering your mind is in itself meditation. By doing a jigsaw puzzle, you’re getting the same benefits as if you meditated. The stress of everyday life evaporates and is replaced by a sense of peace and tranquility that lowers your blood pressure and heart rate. *** Jigsaw puzzles are a great way to connect with family. Starting a jigsaw puzzle and keeping it on a table in your living room, family room or kitchen is an invitation for the whole family to participate, whenever they have a few minutes to sit down and focus. It’s a tactic that parents of teens can use for starting a conversation while working toward a shared goal. *** Conversely, jigsaw puzzles are great for some needed alone time. Puzzling is perfect for people who want a quiet, solo break from the bustle and unrelenting stimulus of today’s digital lifestyle.

*** You’ll live longer, better if you puzzle regularly. Studies show that people who do jigsaw and crossword puzzles have longer life spans with less chances of developing Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss or dementia. Puzzling stimulates the brain and actually wards off the plaque that is the marker of Alzheimer’s, according toastudypublishedintheArchivesofNeurology. Thestudy compared brain scans of 75-year-olds to 25-year-olds. The elderly people who did puzzles regularly had brain scans comparable to the 25-year old’s. *** Doing jigsaw puzzles is good for your mind, body, and spirit. So, on your next lazy day, unplug, put your phone on “Do Not Disturb,” and get swept away by a puzzle. *** I received a new Wisconsin puzzle for Father’s Day from our daughter and I couldn’t wait to get my hands involved in putting it together. The hot days we had last week were ideal for a puzzle challenge in our cool lower level. It’s done! *** Do you have a robins nest in your yard you have been watching? Interesting to read recently that baby robins jump from the nest when they are about 13 days old and about 10 -15 days later they are strong enough fliers and independent birds. *** Here is some powerful advice: One day, you are going to hug your last hug, kiss your last kiss, and hear someone’s voice for the last time, but you never know when the last time will be, so live every day as if it were the last time you will be with the one you love. Birthday’s have a way of making you think these kind of thoughts! *** If you’re a fan of fireworks you can attend various celebrations featuringthemthiscomingweekend. Firstandforemostwillbe the 9:45 pm fireworks at our own Chapman Park on Saturday, July 2. Thorp has fireworks at Northside Park on Friday, July 1 at dusk and there will be fireworks at Maple Hill Tavern on Sunday, July 3 when dark. *** Smile time. Be decisive. Right or wrong, make a decision. The road of life is paved with flat squirrels who couldn’t make a decision. +++ The lady at Walgreen’s is staring at me like she’s never seen anyone put on deodorant and then put it back on the shelf. +++ Never in my whole life did I ever imagine that my hands would consume more alcohol than my mouth (hand sanitizer used during COVID). +++ Never make a woman mad. They can remember stuff that hasn’t even happened yet. +++ If you don’t like where you are, move. You’re not a tree. +++ Behind every angry woman, stands a man who has absolutely no idea what he did wrong! +++ A wise man once said nothing. +++ Every once in awhile I go outside and run the vacuum cleaner over the driveway just to ensure that the neighbors never talk to me. +++ The ability to speak several languages is an asset, but your ability to keep you mouth shut in any language is priceless. +++ Never make fun of someone who speaks broken English. It means they know another language. +++ Education is important, but opening the pubs (after/during COVID) was importanter. +++ I’ll never forget the look on the cashier’s face when she scanned the packet of bird seed and I asked how long it takes for the birds to grow once I plant the seed. +++ Reading can seriously damage your ignorance. +++ Do you know how weird it is being the same age as old people? +++ According to Albert Einstein, “The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.”

BY DAVID JANKOSKI